Danfoss Briefing Provides Positive Forecasts, Technology Updates

COMPOSED OF PRESS RELEASE AND ONLINE PRESENTATIONS

Baltimore, Maryland — Danfoss hosted its 26th annual virtual press conference on February 11, following on from the AHR Expo in 2022. Danfoss executives briefed members of the media on trends in the HVACR industry and the technologies it has developed. Heat pumps, heat recovery, special outdoor air systems and the ongoing refrigerant transition were the main topics as Danfoss leadership emphasized the need for innovation and application of new technologies to achieve the low carbon economy and energy efficiency targets.

John GalyenDanfoss North America President, launched the event and expressed hope that Danfoss would be back at the AHR Expo in person in 2023. Galyen provided an update on Danfoss’ business performance in 2021 and a look ahead at the challenges ahead in 2022. With what Danfoss and others believe is increasing awareness of climate change and reducing CO2 footprint of the world, Galyen emphasized the importance of energy-efficient heating and cooling technologies.

“Energy efficiency is our number one fuel,” said Galyen. “We have proven and under-implemented technologies that can have a significant impact in the short term, and these technologies are paving the way for other future innovations. Every kilowatt saved today means a brighter future.”

Galyen said Danfoss is well positioned to help customers create new, energy efficient HVACR systems. highlighting the new technologies that Danfoss has developed: heat exchangers, special outdoor air systems (DOAS), more efficient heat pumps and compressors compatible with low GWP and ultra low GWP refrigerants. With the upcoming phase-out of HFC refrigerants, “Danfoss not only has the technologies, but also the knowledge and expertise to help our customers with this transition,” said Galyen. He shared the news that Danfoss sales in North America grew more than 21 percent in 2021 from 2020 and expects to see double-digit growth in 2022.

With the upcoming phase-out of HFC refrigerants, “Danfoss not only has the technologies, but also the knowledge and expertise to help our customers with this transition,” said John Galyen.

Galyen stated that Danfoss is committed to: research and development and innovation, and reported that two Danfoss Turbocor oil-free compressors were recognized in the 2022 AHR Innovation Awards, bringing the number of Danfoss awards recognized in 18 years to 33.

Technology for more efficiency

Other technology innovations that HVACR contractors and their customers can expect include variable speed technology, next-generation heat exchangers that use plates and microchannels to replace older, less efficient technologies, low-GWP refrigerant-compatible products, and heat pump technologies. prevent carbonization.

“Heat exchangers allow systems to operate more efficiently, by reducing equipment size and enabling faster heat transfer processes, saving energy,” said Galyen.

“In 2022 there will be significant changes in the refrigerant,” he continued, “and we are at a transition point. The HVAC phase-out is likely to lead to some initial confusion as the standards are implemented, and with differences between our regions. At Danfoss Not only do we develop compressors that are compatible with low GWP and ultra-low GWP, we have the knowledge and expertise to help your readers understand and navigate this transition.

“Net zero CO2 emissions require us to develop new heating technologies to drive growth in heat pumps, heat recovery and heat recovery. We have broad experience based on work we’ve done in Europe and Asia, along with a portfolio of products and solutions to help our North American customers.”

Regulatory and Technology Challenges

John Sheff, Director of Public and Industry Affairs at Danfoss, shared insights on the changing regulatory landscape and how Danfoss is helping customers address these new challenges, particularly in the area of decarbonization and the switch to electric heat pump technology.

“The Bipartisan Infrastructure Act was a landmark piece of legislation, adding $580 billion in new spending on roads, tunnels and bridges over the next five years. It also provides $65 billion to upgrade the country’s electrical grid.”

The Build Back Better bill was shut down in March, but as originally drafted, Sheff explained it would allocate $550 billion to climate-related initiatives, including direct rebates for electrification of heating equipment, which would cover most if not all of the costs to build residential properties. electrify heating systems.

Sheff reported that it is highly unlikely that all 50 states will have new building codes in place by January 2025 to allow the use of highly flammable A2L refrigerants, which is why, he said, the Environmental Protection Agency is planning an uneven rollout of A2L adoption.

Sheff reported that it is highly unlikely that all 50 states will have new building codes in place by January 2025 to restrict the use of A2L Highly Flammable Refrigerants, which is why, he said, the Environmental Protection Agency is planning an uneven rollout of A2L adoption. There may also be a shortage of HFC refrigerants, as the 40 percent decline in HFC availability is scheduled for 2024. Sheff said the EPA has agreed to review the HFC allocation process before 2024. There will also be more reclamation activities in the US, he said.

Sheff gave an update on the developments in heat pump technology, which could see increased demand as electrification trends expand in the US. This goal will also require more attention.

“In cold weather, it is very difficult to use ambient air as a heat source and to heat water above 40°C (104F). A water system using a heat pump chiller will generally have a minimum of 45°C (113F) water to work effectively,” he explains. “Air-to-water heat pumps are also 10-15% less efficient than water-to-water heat pumps due to the low ambient air temperatures.”

Sheff said using other heat sources is possible and makes sense in terms of efficiency. These sources include the use of waste heat from data centers, commercial cooling systems or wastewater treatment plants, which can provide a constant source of heat all year round.

“In addition, these heat sources can be centralized, creating the opportunity for ‘district heating’ and cooling. Entire building blocks can share resources to build incredibly efficient neighborhood energy systems. Danfoss is involved in several such projects in Europe, but it is not common in the US from an infrastructure and business model and regulatory aspects.”

Sheff said the US HVACR industry is moving toward a future that uses air-to-water heat pumps rather than a combination boiler and chiller.

Hans Ole Matthiesenglobal refrigeration chief marketing at Danfoss, spoke about Danfoss’ heat recovery technologies and the importance of heat recovery and reuse in reducing carbon emissions and showed demonstration cases in data centers, supermarkets and ice rinks, and Sankar Padhmanabhan, global application expert in air conditioning at Danfoss, spoke about Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems (DOAS) and how they play a critical role in improving indoor air quality and ventilation with improved efficiency through the use of variable speed compressors.

The briefing also featured a recent Danfoss customer, Jae Chonbusiness development manager at Chesapeake Systems, on Chesapeake Systems’ installation of a new HVAC system with a synchronized hydraulic loop at the courthouse of Towson, Maryland, using Danfoss components.

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